Why Is There a Burning Odor From the Furnace?

Monday, February 18th, 2019

furnace-burners-smallA furnace generates heat, either using gas burners or electrical heating elements, to warm up the air, then uses a blower to send the heated air into the ductwork of a home. As with any heat-generating appliance, there’s some potential for a fire hazard, although this is rare for modern furnaces. However, if you ever notice an acrid burning odor coming from the vents when your home’s furnace is running, it can be alarming.

Is there reason to be concerned? On some occasions, yes. If you don’t know why it’s happening, please shut off the furnace and call an HVAC professional for furnace repair in Shreveport, LA. Trying to investigate furnace troubles or doing repairs yourself may lead to safety hazards.

Below, we list some of the reasons why you may notice burning odors from your furnace and what to do about it.

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Do You Have a Gas Furnace? A Few Things to Keep in Mind

Monday, January 7th, 2019

carbon-monoxide-detectorNow that we’ve settled into the winter, the heater in your home will work on a regular basis to provide comfort. Chances are high that the heating system you have installed is a gas furnace—the most popular type of home heating system in the country. A gas furnace is reliable and uses an inexpensive fuel to run.

However, to get the best and safest performance from your gas furnace, there are a few things to keep in mind.

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Checking the Furnace Flue: It Could Be a Lifesaver!

Monday, March 5th, 2018

gas-furnace-flames

Safety is a vital part of all the jobs we do for our customers. When we fix a natural gas furnace in a house, we don’t just ensure that it will come on, provide heat, and operate at energy-saving levels. We also make sure it runs as safely as possible. Although gas furnaces are built with the same priority on safety that we use in our work, it is possible for the combustion byproducts from the furnace—which include carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide—to accidentally enter living spaces. These are toxic gases and create many serious, life-threatening health hazards.

You’re probably aware of what high concentrations of these gases do. But the safety concerns aren’t only about a large amount of combustion byproducts flooding into a home. There’s also the risk of chronic exposure to low levels. The symptoms aren’t as obvious, but over the long-term can be just as dangerous, especially to infants and the elderly. The main reason for the low-level presence of combustion byproducts is a furnace that is venting poorly.

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Atmospheric vs. Sealed Combustion Furnaces: What’s the Difference?

Tuesday, February 28th, 2017

furnace-burners-burning-blueThe technology of heating and cooling a home is a field that’s always advancing. When it comes to furnaces, the new technology is designed to meet four goals:

  • Making the furnace safer
  • Increasing reliability and a reduction in repair issues
  • Better indoor comfort
  • Improving energy efficiency

Today we’re going to look at the sealed combustion furnace, which is an advance in furnace technology that hits all four of those goals. But first, we have to talk about atmospheric combustion furnaces, the older technology that sealed combustion furnaces aim to replace.

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What Is the Big Difference Between How Electric and Gas Furnaces Run?

Monday, February 6th, 2017

burners-gas-furnaceTo most people, a furnace is just a furnace. Regardless of the power supply that it uses, a furnace is a device that heats up, then heats up the air, and then sends that air through ductwork to the rooms.

You really don’t need to know much more than this. As long as you know to rely on professionals to take care of annual maintenance for your home’s furnace (make sure you do it every fall) and remember to regularly change the air filters, you can expect your furnace to put in years of great work keeping your family warm.

But a little knowledge can often help, especially when you’re thinking about getting a new furnace. So we’re going to look a bit closer into what makes electric furnaces and gas furnaces different. It’s more than just the type of energy they use!

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Carbon Monoxide Testing: Why It’s Important

Monday, December 5th, 2016

Do you use natural gas in your home? Whether you use it for powering appliances in the kitchen, running a furnace, or both, it’s important that you test your home for the presence of harmful levels of carbon monoxide (CO). Carbon monoxide is a byproduct of the incomplete combustion of natural gas (as well as other fuels, but the principle concern in homes comes from natural gas) and it can leak from malfunctioning appliances or become backed up into a home if it isn’t properly vented.

Even homes that don’t rely on natural gas can have CO problems if they have an attached garage: fumes from vehicles can easily enter the living spaces. Other CO sources include kerosene heaters and poorly vented fireplaces.

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Warnings about Carbon Monoxide This Winter

Monday, November 14th, 2016

This is an important warning we like to post before the start of each winter season. When the cold weather arrives, you’ll start to use your furnace on a regular basis to keep your household toasty warm. Chances are high that you have a natural gas furnace, which is the most popular type of residential heating system in North America. There are a number of good reasons for this:

  • Natural gas is less expensive a fuel source than electricity.
  • It’s convenient, piped right into your home.
  • It burns cleanly, with few harmful emissions.
  • Gas-powered furnaces can provide powerful levels of heat.

But there’s one downside to using natural gas for heat, and it’s the potential for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning.

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